Lent Day 18 – God of the Nations

by Bishop Robert Barron


While we take comfort from much of the Bible’s message, the Bible is not always comforting news. It often carries a message of warning and danger. It’s good for us, during this Lenten season, to attend to the darker side of the Biblical message.

For example, when we read in the Old Testament about the pollution of the Lord’s Temple, it’s a familiar prophetic theme: the people have wandered from the ways of God, rendering impure what God intends to be just and upright. God sends prophet after prophet in order to bring his people back, but they are ignored, mocked, and rejected. Then God’s judgment falls on the unfaithful nation.

What is the instrument of God’s justice? One of the heathen nations, the Chaldeans, who come and destroy the city of Jerusalem, burn the Temple, carry off its most sacred objects, and lead the people into exile.

What is this? Dumb bad luck? Just the give and take of geo-political forces? No! The Bible insists that this should be read as God’s action—more specifically as God’s judgment and punishment. How at odds this is with the typically modern/Enlightenment view, according to which religion is a private matter, confined to the heart and the mind of the individual. For the Biblical authors, God is the Lord of history and time, and hence the Lord of nations and the Lord of nature. His works and actions must be discerned in all events.

Let me give you an example of such a boldly theological reading of political events. Karl Barth is considered one of the greatest Protestant theologians of the twentieth century. At the start of the First World War, he was a country pastor in Switzerland who had been trained in the confident liberal theology that was all the rage around the turn of the last century. This theology shared the common view that with the rise of the natural sciences, with the development of technology, and with political and cultural liberation, human beings could build the Kingdom of God here on earth.

From the quiet of his parsonage in Switzerland, Barth followed the horrors of the First World War, the slaughter of hundreds of thousands, the devastation of nations, the collapse of the European social order. Then something dawned on him: the conviction that it was precisely the inflated self-regard and hubris of nineteenth century liberalism that led to this disaster!

He saw the European powers as descendants of the builders of the Tower of Babel, attempting to reach up to God on their own terms and in their own way. Behind the sunny confidence of the liberal period, he discerned arrogance, imperialism, and colonialism. The advances of science were made possible through the rape of the environment and economic comfort for some was made possible through the enslavement of others. In all of this, he read current events in light of God’s great plan.

As difficult as that sometimes is to do, it’s how we’re to read our lives as well.

   

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  • Anton D

    “. . . attempting to reach up to God on their own terms and in their own way.”

  • ber

    Warning after warning yet we are as dumb as ever have we lernt nothing from past experience I talk in regard to nature and it’s fources telling us see going the wrong way but will we listen its hard to see gods hand in the disasters that befall us as we see him as a harmless God but there his justice even in my own life when I get it wrong it’s hard to admit I’m wrong but I know in doing so it can only make things better price is a sad fate when left to run its course I’m learning

  • concerned citizen

    In the Old Testament, we see God punishing hand several times: the great flood; sodom and gomorrah; 7 plagues; etc.. In the modern times, the closest I can see to God’s punishment was World War I and II, which our Lady of Fatima told the three children were punishment by God for the sins of mankind. Many today find it hard to believe in a God who punishes. And so we have one opinion that says God does not punish but He allows tragedies, wars, disasters to happen as punishment. But as Bishop Barron explains, the Bible insists that this should be read as God’s justice and punishment.

    The question is: if the sins of modern society is far greater than they were during the two World Wars, are we in for a greater World War?

    • Anton D

      God corrects us sometimes collectively and sometimes individually.

      Should we see all ‘bad’ happenings as punishment from God? We humans cannot claim to be sure.

      • Rosemaid

        How about those crushed by the falling tower of which Jesus spoke? Were they worse sinners? We all dwell in this fallen world “created” by our corporate brokenness.

      • concerned citizen

        The other question to ask: Could we have prevented these bad things from happening, if enough people prayed enough? I would say yes. If the billions of Catholics would pray the Holy Rosary everyday, there would surely be peace in this world. But I wonder how many do pray the Holy Rosary everyday. Would it reach even 1%?

        • Gary

          Prayer is our only hope.

          • concerned citizen

            Some people say the request of Our Lady of Fatima for the Holy Father to concentrate Russia specifically (not the whole world) together with the bishops of the world to her Immaculate Heart has not yet been fulfilled. I tend to agree with this opinion. And I believe that the only time this would happen, is if there are enough Catholics in every diocese fulfilling her first two requests which is to pray the Holy Rosary everyday, wear the Brown Scapular and do the first five Saturdays. When that happens, the bishops all over the world will be willing to cooperate with the Holy Father and join in the Consecration of Russia. But the two requests have to be fulfilled first.

    • Anniloh

      I think we are in deep trouble. And I think it will get worse before it gets better.

      • Kathleen N

        Call me Debbie Downer but I don’t think it’s going to get better, it’s going to get worse.
        “And because lawlessness will be increased, the love of many will grow cold. (Matthew 24:12)”
        I understand this to say that even some Christians faith will grow cold and evil and wickedness will continue to grow… until Christ returns.

    • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

      Hi CC,

      Here are a couple of points to think about !
      God’s Justice is not mankind’s justice. We do not think as God does, which is absolute and without error!

      Second, there are those, and I know a few, who believe that when Jesus returns, He will build His London on earth. Not true.

      When Pilate asked Jesus about His Kingdom, Jesus replied, “My Kingdom is not of this world”!

      As for the thought of punishment of the world for its sinful decent,, read or listen to the prophetic words of the Blessed Mother to the four visionaries (girls) of Garabandal!

      Padre Prio, confirmed the vilidity of the apparitions.

      People think things cannot get worse, well sit down and read what she said will happen if the world doesn’t, turn back to God. The time is drawing near.
      This event is “not the last coming or the end of the world but a merciful “wake IP call to the world to change or be punished severely.

      http://www.garabandal.org

      Peace,

      Michael

      • concerned citizen

        Thanks Michael for the link. Allow me to post an interesting account of a devil during an exorcism saying to the priest:

        What are you Christians doing? Where are your Holy Hours? Who has the time for them when you have other more pleasant things to do. Isn’t Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, and He alone the One Who can get rid of all your worries and sicknesses. We laugh! Because you are few against us. Instead, are you not coming to us, and to our superstitious acts to get rid of your troubles? Yes, you Catholics! Will God spare you unless you repent?

        • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

          Hi CC,

          That is troubling but true. The evil one uses our own beliefs against us! One thing he said was “our supersitions”!
          First impression, he was talking about the Rite of Exorcism”!
          I found this to be very unsettling….! I don’t know when it started but since I was in the seminary, many things have changed, one being exorcism. Some seminaries have deemphasied the relavence of “exorcising demons, saying that is an old church rite no longer needed and in some circles , that demonic possession was nothing more than the Churches “misinturpatation of unknowns diseases !

          That scares me. Although they are rare, they are real!!
          It use to be that in every diocese, the Bishop had only one exorcist known only to a few, for advious reason. All ordained priests, (Catholic of course) have the power but not all are called. Only one who possesses great faith and love of God.
          Another may be the rosary. Demons hate the rosary and they are scared of it. Not a superstition but a truth of which I know first hand! That is way we fail to pray the rosary… the old, “I don’t have time” excuse.

          • concerned citizen

            Michael, there are exorcisms still happening in many parts of the world. I have friends who have seen the devil get out of the man’s body during the exorcism and they say his figure is hideous. I agree that the Holy Rosary is our best weapon against the devil.

          • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

            CC,

            That has to shake your soul. I have never seen one, and I don’t want to but I have felt their presences and that was unnerving, to put it lightly!!

            Since the first experience I carry a rosary every where I go!

            There is a chaplet to St. Michael and the Holy Angels. I need to get back to saying it!

            Prayer is needed in a world in deep trouble!

            Peace and prayers,

            Michael

        • Vicky Montani

          God will forgive all who ask of him.

      • Vicky Montani

        I agree our only way to help is to pray. To call on His son to hear our prayers and keep our lives holy as we can. Be the good Christian that Jesus asks of us. Be that light in the world. God has everything else within his power. Peace be with you all.

        • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

          Vicky,

          Amen to that!
          Peace be with your spirit with the Love of Jesus in your heart

          Michael

    • Nancy Rynders

      I believe so, in many ways. Mass shootings in schools and communities, numerous tornadoes and other natural disasters, and the ever-present evidence of political unrest and violence certainly are evidence of such a “World War.” Is it God’s justice and punishment for today’s sin? And, if so, what are we going to do about it?

    • http://voyagesextraordinaires.blogspot.com/ Cory Gross

      I take the view that God’s punishment is not an arbitrary imposition, but rather, a natural consequence of the sin itself. “We are punished BY our sin, not FOR our sin.”

      So taking that view, are we not being punished? We pollute the environment, so the environment lashes out at us with extreme weather and a decreasing ability to sustain human life. America was built on a foundation of slavery, and now the legacy of that slavery is tearing American cities apart. American glorification of individualism – that helping each other is a sin, that you’re owed the right to a murder weapon, that violence ultimately solves all problems, that everything can be monetized – has lead directly to mass shootings and the Wall Street collapse. And on, and on.

      • concerned citizen

        That could be very well true. There could actually be no need for God to send us punishments. Just leaving us alone to our sinful acts is enough because as you said the tragedies and disasters are by themselves a result of our sins against nature and against each other.

    • Gary

      This is nothing as compared to what the book of Revelation, that Jesus revealed to John, has to say in Chapters 8 and 9. Here is just one verse. Rev. 8:7 “The first angel sounded the trumpet, and there came hail and fire mixed with blood, and it was hurled down upon the earth. A third of the earth was burned up, and a third of the trees were burned up, and all the green grass was burned up.” I believe that this future event will occur when the evil in the world gets so bad, worse then in the days of Sodom and Gomorrah, and the days of Noah, that we leave God no choice but to pour down his wrath on the earth. This world is casting God to the side and accepting evil as a normal way of life. If it continues on this path, we will surely be judged. Examples: Abortions, Homosexual marriages, and the increase of Godlessness in the world. World wide tension as a result of increases in terrorist and a world wide economic system on the brink of failure. Hate to sound pessimistic. Good new is that those who are committed to their love of the Lord, JESUS, will be kept in his love. I look forward to his coming back for me.

      • concerned citizen

        In a way Sodom and Gomorrah could still be worse than ours, since not even five just people could be found. Although in terms of percentages, I don’t know what five people represent, since we do not know the population of S and G.

  • http://www.gunjones.com Wm. Thomas Sherman

    While I fully agree that so many of the global calamities and tragedies of the 19th and 20th can be linked to reckless secularism, we must not forget that one of the forces that prompted and drove about modernistic secular ideology were the fully as brutal wars of religion, circa 1550-1698. We shudder at the gulag and concentration camps, but read about the many religious massacres and truly horrific wars of the Reformation and Counter Reformation. The point I would make here is that it is less ideology that is the culprit than it is the daemonic, or criminal spirit people, leading people away from honest rationality into a world of illusion and absurd wishful thinking, whether that illusion be secular or religious based. At the same time, what efforts are made to scientifically and objectively understand criminal spirit people? And if we ignore the latter and blame the false dogma, are not the greater culprits getting off scot free? The fact is we are all too ready to blame the dupes of false, hypocritical philosophies while completely ignoring these who duped them; unless it be to mark and mention the latter by way of bland and fanciful characterization of little or know practical value and application.

  • Phil Hosemann

    I am with you almost the way and all the way if this comment – “The advances of science
    were made possible through the rape of the environment and economic comfort for
    some was made possible through the enslavement of others.” – is what Barth thought. I will draw strong umbrage certainly with the first part of the sentence, but to a lesser extent to the second. While advances in science may have been used by some to ends which harmed the environment, both the discoverers and most of the applications have resulted in common good to humanity. As to the second part of the sentence, this speaks to the greed of some which has manifested itself through time and has been inherent throughout time, not just since the beginning of the Industrial Era. While it is clear that God permits evil to exist in common with Good and does allow those who accept evil their wish, it is His fervent wish that humanity recognize evil for what it is and rather return to Him.

    • Lori Bisser

      Anen

    • http://voyagesextraordinaires.blogspot.com/ Cory Gross

      It’s a common misconception that science is divorced from the culture around it. It’s understandable, because science is built on the whole premise of detached observation: that the observer can stand apart from the world and treat the world as a separate object of study. It stands apart and detached from concerns of morals, ethics, economics, etc. Of course, that view IN ITSELF is enculturated from the European Enlightenment and its ethos of human domination of nature, others, and arguably even God. Science as we know it developed in Europe and not in other cultures because of Europe’s secularization (which was itself a collective traumatic response to the Black Death)… Europe’s divestment of sacredness from nature, from other people, from religion, from the economy, from politics… The treatment of the universe as a dead and inanimate place full of objects which, then, could be studied and controlled.

      We like to think that science is objective and that research stands apart from application, but that’s just not true. The Scientific Method ensures checks and balances in the accuracy of research, but it is still human beings deciding what to research, what can be researched, what ought to be researched, and application is inherent to the research itself. For example, the reluctance to move to more environmentally sensitive forms of energy has less to do with the economics of it (you can make money at anything, somehow) than it does with the fact that most “green energy” methods are politically decentralized. Solar power, for example, is best produced where it is used (i.e.: on a housetop). Traditional energy is produced at centralized locations, from which it is purchased. The biggest problem with nuclear power is not the toxic waste or possibility of an accident in itself. It’s the exit strategy, and the fact that there isn’t one. What is going to happen to those nuclear reactors and nuclear waste on the inevitable day that the United States of America ceases to exist as a political entity? Maybe they have a plan, but I doubt it: nuclear power inherently presupposes and relies upon the immortality of the existing political order. It is the ultimate centralized power source.

      Yes, science has given us a lot of good… we’re chatting on it right now… but it has also come at a cost. Unless we find a proper place for science, and properly recognize it as a human activity, those costs might ultimately end up being too much to bear.

  • Lori Bisser

    What if these are instead of punishments these are opportunities to learn, to wake up, to return to God?

    • Bonnie Willett-Goad

      I like your way of thinking Lori

  • http://findmeinflorida.wordpresscom Tampa Lady

    I like your story here. Pride was really in their optimism. They forgot that evil exists. People want their way along with technology. JP2 in Toronto 84 said never let technology get in the way of the Kingdom of God. I remember that clearly even though I was there when he said that as a visiting college student . Don’t make it your God. Love is more important. That’s how we get wars: that and selfishness.

    • http://findmeinflorida.wordpresscom Tampa Lady

      Again it is all about free will and the choice to love. Man has refused and loved things more. There is no balance. That is why we fight in the church.

  • chuck

    The most hideous of all human events … The Crucifixion. What did God do with that? The Resurrection.The greatest good out of the greatest evil.With that, we can confidently Pray Lord bring us goodness out of evil.ALL things work together for good, for those who love God and are called according to his purpose. Romans 8:28

    • Murieta Marsha

      Excellent, Chuck. You summed it up in a nut shell. Paul put an exclamation on it-you seconded the motion! Thank you.

  • Penelope

    I was brought to believe that I could do anything I set my mind to. As I grew older and began to hit the proverbial “brick walls” of life, I had to give up this way of thinking and surrender my life to God. I chose to live as Mary did…my life is yours, Lord, “Do with me as you will.” My life is not perfect, it’s a work in progress, but I have found that it is much easier trying to do God’s Will than my own.

    How many lives are lived this way, independent of God, until we wake up. It’s like the story of Eden all over again, when the eyes of Adam and Eve were opened, and they knew that they were naked.

    I thought of a verse found a couple of times in the Book of Judges: “In those days there was no king in Israel; all the people did what was right in their own eyes.” Judges 17:6, 21:25.

    There are many, many laws that are already in place, and others right this minute being put in place, that are clearly against God’s Will, all being done under the guise of being good for people.

    The Good thing is that we do have a King, the King of Kings, the Lord Jesus Christ – and nothing is “under the guise” for Him, everything is clear, everything can be brought into the Light of Truth. If we have ears to hear, and eyes to see, if we surrender “what is right in our own eyes,” we can know the Truth, through the teachings of our Church, through the Magisterium, through the prophets God sends us today.

    1John 4:1-6 speaks about “Testing the Spirits”, to see whether they are from God. There is a great reflection given in my Lectio Divina Edition of the Catholic Prayer Bible that ends with the following question for reflection, similar to today’s reflection:
    Engaging our present world situation is necessary and important. The believer does not flee or try to escape. In what ways does my faith dialogue with the modern world?

    May the Lord continue to bless and enlighten our Lenten journey! Thank you so much, Bishop Barron.

    • Mary

      My thoughts exactly! My friends who do their own will constantly and blame God for every bad result of their choices are miserable. My heart bleeds for them.

      • Kathleen N

        So true! Don’t blame God, own up! “You are your choices”~Seneca

        • Anton D

          Sometimes people lack Wisdom to make the right choices.

          Hosea 4:6 – My people perish for want of knowledge. . . .

          • Kathleen N

            Agreed, some people do lack the wisdom to do what is right. God calls us to seek wisdom as we see in Proverbs. We need to avoid placing the blame on God or others for our own poor choices in life. By recognizing and taking ownership, personal growth can happen.

          • Anton D

            It may not entirely be our effort but also involves God’s Grace.

      • Penelope

        Yes, it is very hard to see those we care for making choices that are not helpful for their lives. And the reality is, many of the choices we make are reflections of our past – the familiar ways that we know. Jesus said, Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.
        I can accompany others best by being present to them, with a listening ear. I can pray for them, and ask the Lord to bless them with His Wisdom. I can ask the Lord to show me how to respond with love and compassion.

        I love these Scripture verses from the book of James on faith and wisdom:
        “My brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of any kind, consider it nothing but joy, because you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance; and let endurance have its full effect, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking in nothing.”

        I pray almost daily with this last verse below, because I need God’s Wisdom every day; I also pray this Scripture verse for my friends and loved ones…

        Lord, Your Word tells me:
        “If any of you is lacking in wisdom, ask God, who gives to all generously and ungrudgingly, and it will be given you.”
        Lord, I give this situation into your hands, —– , and I ask you to bless (me, my friend ) with Your Wisdom. Thank You, Lord.
        I pray this in Jesus’ Holy Name. Amen.

        (James 1:2-5)

        • Mary

          Thank you!!!

  • Nancy Rynders

    We were given free will, and so, we sin. Sin can certainly lead to punishment, so in a way, we are punishing ourselves when we choose evil over good. Our God is a fair and loving Father. He loves us enough to give us the choice, but also loves us enough to allow pain due to bad choices. How else can we learn, and return to Him?

    • Gary

      He disciplines those he loves.

  • Joseph T. Garcia

    ” Father , thank you for the robe , the ring , and the sandals you offer me as I turn to you . “

  • Barry Blackburn

    Dear Bishop Barron, It seems to me that Teilhard de Chardin came out of this Liberal tradition that you mentioned. I’ve always been attracted to his science and religion which is sometimes problematic to scientists and traditional Catholics. How do you see/read Teilhard?

  • Barry Blackburn

    To read the World and our own lives in the light of the Bible is to be assured of the Presence of God’s Providence. This is a spiritual reading and act of Faith and cannot be a programme of discernment by applying any Bible passage to any specific situation ie we cannot read the world or ourselves Biblically in a literal way: do this, see this and God will reward or punish etc. At least this is not helpful for me. What is helpful for me is to “see” God present in the Bible stories so that we can “see” God present in our lives and the World–not as a literal reading but as a loving Providence and call to live and love.

    • Gary

      Do not forget. God has another side to him. JUSTICE. I think this is what Bishop Baron was referring to.

  • rtclovesmac

    As our Lady called us to pray for the conversion of Russia, please join me in a prayer for the conversion of the US and the selection of a leader that reflects the faithfulness in God called for by Christ delivered in a manner as our Lord.

  • rtclovesmac

    As a Catholic committed to my civic responsibilities, I am concerned with the group “Catholic Voice’s” assault on Donald Trump. While I am a Trump supporter, should he win the nomination and go up against either Hilary or Bernie, for whom would the group call us to vote? I am still confident that if we turn to him and pray, He will provide a leader reflective of His mercy….or are we at the point in our cultural history that we are just beginning to experience the judgement of God on His people for abandoning His way?

    • http://findmeinflorida.wordpresscom Tampa Lady

      Pray about that. The story of Lazarus. Read it . God Bless. :) Pray about it .

      • rtclovesmac

        I did. And not so coincidentally today’s post was on Lazarus’ death and rebirth. While today’s post added to my perspective on the three incidences Christ raised people from the dead, I am not sure of your point in regards to my post regarding the upcoming choices in our elections.
        Please feel free to clarify.

        • http://findmeinflorida.wordpresscom Tampa Lady

          Can you email me and not have this back and forth discussion here? stark61555@live.com Also If voting is the only thing you do and not reading the Bible and going to divineoffice.org every morning, or not journaling or praying to go to deep prayer so you can be there for others, I feel bad for you. Most of these people in politics LIE.

        • http://findmeinflorida.wordpresscom Tampa Lady

          I live in Florida, which is not a Super Tuesday state. But keep in mind the Pope had much to say about and against what one uh, man stands for while he was at the border in Mexico. And I was going to point out the parable of the rich man and Lazarus. No hate. Faith hope and love.

  • concerned citizen

    The abortion of babies alone has probably killed 70 times more American people than all the wars in U.S. history combined. All 7 wars are reported to have killed only about 700,000 people. But the total number of babies aborted in the U.S. already exceeds 50.0 million. That alone can safely classify the society today as more sinful than the society was during the first two world wars.

    • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

      Hi CC,

      Here is a true story and a theological dilemma! You may had heard it.

      There are two woman who had reputations, prostitutes as it were. One was poor trying to survive and the other was wealthy and affuant in the circles of the rich!
      Now both got pregnant. Now the decision to abort is left up to you.
      Would you abort the child of the poor woman on the basis that bringing a child into the world would be wrong considering the child would not likely have a future and would only burden the mother or would you choose to abort the child of the woman who could support the child but would not because it would be an inconvenice?

      Your decision could change future events, and you don’t know what they are, only God knows!

      Now the truth to your decision!
      If you decided to abort the child of the poor woman, you would have aborted Leonardo DeVinci and if you aborted the child of the wealthy woman you would have aborted Adolf Hitler!

      Now if you could go back in time knowing this would you abort Hitler?

      Remember what I said concerning interactions with another? You kill Hitler and when you do, you change things. But how would they change? For the better or would things have changed gotten worse?
      It could be that when you changed the past you changed the events leading up to your birth. In other words, you never was born! God has a plan for each child He creates and abortion changes them.

      Peace,

      Michael

      • rtclovesmac

        MLC….No theological dilemma for me….I would not have aborted either.
        Its not that these children came into the world, its what their life experience brought them too.
        Unless of course one subscribes to the belief that this was about one predetermined destiny for us…which I do not.
        In this Hitler’s case, had he been raised as DeVinci, perhaps things may have been different.
        In either case, abortion ends all chance for God’s grace to make a difference in the life of the child.
        But even after an abortion occurs, God’s Mercy can forgive a truly contrite heart.
        And once forgiven, that person can thrive as vessel of God Word, Love and Mercy to others.

  • bergbiker

    How interesting… I just finished reading “Mordecai’s Challenge: An Essay on War, Leadership, and Purim” by Yoram Hazony over at Commentary magazine. Then turning to “Lent Day 18 – God of Nations” and the observations on WW I by Barth that we get what we choose in departing from Godly values. Juxtapose this with my admiration for Pierre Teilhard de Chardin’s elegant theology of ongoing creation by an involved Creator-God, and an awful lot of gears begin to mesh. What an immense canvas for the artistry of the Holy Spirit.
    Hunter Paalman

  • Linda Dokey

    I BELIEVE this whole heartily. Our Church had fallen away from God, power and recognition were taking over. The Bishop closed the doors for awhile. Now we have no Pastor but a Mission Priest on the Sundays only. We are healing and becoming better and stronger because of the Grace of God. We sometimes forget GOD IS IN CONTROL, NOT US.
    THANK YOU BISHOP BARRON! GOD BLESS YOU ALWAYS ♡

  • Dick B.

    I like St. Augustine on this issue of God’s action in our world: “All that happens to us in this world against our will (whether due to men or to other causes) happens to us only by the will of God, by the disposal of Providence, by His orders and under His guidance; and if from the frailty of our understanding we cannot grasp the reason for some event, let us attribute it to divine Providence, show Him respect by accepting it from His hand, believe firmly that He does not send it to us without cause.” Where did we ever get the idea that we’re in charge?

  • Marianne van den Heuvel-Bögels

    The time of the second world war was the time that the Jewish people were incinerated and yes people thinking that they are Gods, led to that. The anti-semitism of Luther, whose ideas Hitler followed, led to him being so powerful. Why did Bishop Baron not mention this evil by it’s name?

  • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

    Hi Brothers and sisters,

    Rather then debate or argue the encryptic nature of the Book of Revelations, here is the link to the Aquinas Study Bible so you can study it on your time.

    s://sites.google.com/site/aquinasstudybible/home/revelation/catena-commentary-on-revelation

    Enjoy!

    Michael
    The Prayer Warrior

  • Màire Ní Bhroin

    I think there is a danger in believing disasters, whether they be global or of a personal nature, are our collective and/or personal fault and therefore God’s punishment of us. When we defile natures laws, of course we are creating a situation that may wreak havoc on us but, is this God’s punishment or nature’s corrective course? Remember, bad things happen to good people and conversely, good things to bad people. If someone is hit by a car, sickened by cancer or injured in a bad weather event like a tornado, should we automatically think God is punishing them? I think not … our God is love & mercy. Isn’t it better to silence this voice of judgement in order to give compassion and support to the victims of the many tragic random events that unfortunately, befall people daily, in this veil of tears?

  • Norma

    There are certain events in the Bible that might suggest of a cold, far and distant God, but Jesus came a abolished any misunderstanding between God and man. He came to this world, so we can have live and abundantly, He gave sense and life to God’s Word, with actual and precise facts.

  • Kathy Lamb

    This is pretty harsh. Even though I don’t quiet know what to make of it, it’s the first one of Bishop Barron’s Lenten Reflections that I’ve wanted to share.